06
Jul
11

Treefiddy Review: Foster The People – Torches

The Down Lizzo

Think of Foster The People as the happier, more carefree younger brother of MGMT. Both bands blend guitar and drum parts with thick, syrupy synth melodies and dreamy, echoey vocals, but where MGMT has a tendency to wade out into deeper, darker waters, Foster The People stays with both feet firmly planted on the bubble gum pink shores of indie pop.

 

Torches is as safe as a hug from your mom and is exactly the kind of album you’d expect from someone who, prior to starting the band, wrote jingles for TV ads.

Expect these songs to creep into at least a dozen of your favourite TV shows and be used to sell everything from Apple products to trendy sneakers because despite what you probably think I’m about to say, this album is pretty damn good.

 

Sick Tracks

By the time they’ve hit the second chorous on “Pumped Up Kicks” you’re already singing it whilst tapping your foot to the wonky bassline as it floats out the speakers and directly into your brain. Frontman Mark Foster’s vocals couldn’t be more chilled as he mumble/sings his way through this indie pop anthem with a voice that sounds like the more stoned version of Maroon 5’s Adam Levine.

“Call It What You Want” is a melting pot of funky synth sounds with a piano melody that could be stolen straight from the Four Seasons track “December 1963 (Oh, What A Night)”. It’s a carefree, dancefloor filler that’s about as edgy as a spoon and as badass as the time you went to bed without brushing your teeth.

“Don’t Stop (Colour On The Walls)” comes on like an early Beck song – tinny guitar strumming, redneck yodelling and more kooky synth blips and bleeps that sound like the mothership could land at any minute. Then the chorous hits and the song hooks you hard and fast and reminds you that despite all appearances, these guys know exactly what they’re doing and they’re doing it well.

 

Should You Give A Shit?

This album is what it is: a surprisingly well-written and catchy collection of indie pop tunes that won’t offend, shock or challenge anyone.

It’s packed full of great hooks, clap-your-hands-and-dance-around carefree summer melodies and chorouses that bounce inside your head for days.

This album could very well become the soundtrack to many, many a great party and for that reason, and the fact that I can appreciate good pop music for what it is, I give Torches the Tiger Stamp Of Approval.

Here’s “Don’t Stop (Colour On The Walls)” so you can judge for yourself.

 

 

Final Verdict: 7/10

-ST


5 Responses to “Treefiddy Review: Foster The People – Torches”


  1. 1 stikey
    July 6, 2011 at 10:56 am

    Desogn, A new word?

    Later Slick

  2. 3 Blake
    July 6, 2011 at 12:50 pm

    Song sounds good, I’m keen to hear more.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

CommentLuv badge